[ourtottenham_news] Objection to application No HGY/2018/2223 - Not one home ought to be built for the private sector on council land until the total demand of council tenants is met.

 
I write to object to this planning application in Tottenham Hale on the grounds that it does nothing at all to meet the demand for permanent homes from Haringey families who are council tenants in temporary accommodation. There is not one council tenancy planned for the site. At the beginning of 2017, according to Trust for London there were 3147 Haringey families in temporary accommodation in the borough and 1299 outside the borough, a total of 4446 . I have asked the council for the trends in the numbers of homeless families from 2010. 
 
The House of Commons Library shows that in July 2018 there has been and increase of 65% in families placed in temporary accommodation in England since 2010 and there was a 250% increase in the number of households placed in temporary accommodation outside of their local authority between the first quarter of 2011 and the first quarter of 2018.  
 
 
My objection is in the grounds that all current tenants of the council and all families in temporary accommodation of the borough ought to be prioritized when planning decisions are being made about the number of council tenancies to be built on council land. They all have tenancy agreements which ought to be respected by the council. Not one home ought to be built for the private sector on council land until the number of council homes to be built equals the number of existing council tenants in permanent accommodation plus the number in temporary accommodation.   A commitment by the council to building 1000 council homes nowhere near reaches the demand from council tenants when there are 4446 homeless families in need of a permanent home.  
 
Young families are being placed in temporary accommodation when their children are entering education; and leaving it ten or more years later when it ends. That is often after several evictions owing to landlords taking a profit on their land, overcrowding or appalling maintenance of the accommodation by the landlord. The damage to children's education of frequently moving house and losing friends is well known and ought to be fully taken into account by council planners.   
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From the Reverend Paul Nicolson

 

Taxpayers Against Poverty
A VOICE FOR THE COMPASSIONATE MAJORITY
No citizen without an affordable home and an
adequate income in work or unemployment.
 
"Launching "The Moral Case Campaign" for adequate minimum incomes and truly affordable housing" 
This free seminar on the 1st November in the Houses of Parliament comes at a time when low incomes and high rents and increasing mortgages in the UK are creating debt, hunger, homelessness, mental and physical ill health. 

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The plight of homeless families housed in temporary accommodation by local government in England

We suggest the housing priority for UK national and local government must be to move homeless families placed in insecure temporary accommodation by councils into permanent, truly affordable housing in their own communities before any national or international private developer makes one more immoral £1,000,0000 profit out of English land.

Taxpayers Against Poverty is supporting the newly founded Temporary Accommodation Group Love Lane, aka @TAGLoveLane in the North London borough of Haringey. Taxpayers Against Poverty is supporting the newly founded Temporary Accommodation Group Love Lane, aka @TAGLoveLane in the North London borough of Haringey. Hope more tenants will form TAG groups to campaign for permanent homes and secure communities, 

On Haringey Council's Love Lane estate, 300 tenants/leaseholders are being crushed by the combined might of Tottenham Hotspur Football Club, international property developers Lend Lease and Haringey Council. Tottenham Hotspur is building a new stadium, and a new White Hart Lane railway station forms part of the redevelopment. Love Lane Estate is between the two. It is being demolished to make way for a smart new walkway to link one to the other.

As a result, Haringey Council is swapping each permanent tenant moved out prior to the estate’s demolition for a tenant in temporary accommodation, who is moved in only to be moved out again when the estate is gradually torn down. The threat of Compulsory Purchase Orders that hangs over the small businesses in the neighbourhood is another abuse of power. 

There are more than 3,000 homeless families housed by Haringey Council in temporary accommodation in the borough and another 1,000 housed outside the borough, according to Trust for London. However, there has been no attempt by the council to plan for the building of 4,000 more council homes on council land to meet the demand for truly affordable homes for the borough's homeless. Haringey Council makes deals with wealthy developers that allow them to profit from the inflated market prices of homes built for the private sector on council land.

 
 

Homeless families in temporary accommodation are at the mercy of greedy landlords and buy-to-let speculators in the under-regulated UK housing market.

They are evicted every time a landlord wants vacant possession prior to selling a freehold and taking the large capital gains available from land in the UK. Homes are sometines dirty and/or overcrowded. It is even worse for single adults hit by high private rents, poverty incomes with zero-hours contracts, and the so-called bedroom tax. They are abandoned by the government and many find themselves in hunger and on the streets as a consequence. 



The rising incidence of temporary accommodation in England, reported in a House of Commons Briefing Paper is scandalous. 

"The most recent official statistics, published on 27 June 2018, recorded 79,880 households in temporary accommodation at the end of March 2018. This marks the 27th time that the number of households in temporary accommodation has risen compared with the same quarter of the previous year. The 79,880 households include 123,230 children, representing a 65% increase since the first quarter of 2010. Of these households, 54,540 (68%) were placed in temporary accommodation in London. The number of families with dependent children placed in B&B-style accommodation increased from 630 at the end of March 2010 to 2,180 at the end of March 2018."

 

"The moral case for adequate minimum incomes and truly affordable housing" 

This free seminar comes at a time when low incomes and high rents and increasing mortgages in the UK are creating debt, hunger, homelessness, mental and physical ill health. REGISTER
 

 

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